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7 Disc 'Collector's Edition' - Indepth Review
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Posted 03/08/2005 23:27


Martian Elder
Supreme Being

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Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds
Collector's Edition

7 Disc Collector's Package Of Jeff Wayne's Musical Masterpiece!


By Jonathan Smith (aka - Horsell_Common) 

To order your copy and receive 10% off RRP, go to the bottom of this page.

THE ALBUM

In June 1978, sci-fi and music fans the world over were introduced to an extraordinary musical masterpiece that rocked the world and some 30 years later is still loved by millions. Based on the 1898 novel by British author H.G.Wells, Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds is still largely regarded as the 'definitive' telling of the chilling story of a Martian invasion upon the world during Victorian times. The album captures the powerful essence that H.G.Wells brought over in the novel, a chilling realistic tale of Victorian society bought down to it's knee's as monstrous Fighting Machines armed with deathly Heat Rays set about the English Country side, heading towards the London capitol in the quest to take over the world.

Like the book, Jeff Wayne needed to have a storyteller and this was given to the late great Richard Burton who still haunts and captivates our senses to this day with his presence on the recordings. It is common for many fans of the album to dim the lights, close the doors and play Richard Burton's haunting opening narration that is quickly followed by the sudden burst of orchestral strings - chilling, moving, effective and above all just so right.

Joining the vast array of talented musicians and song writers such as Paul Vigrass and Gary Osbourne, guitar work from such artistes as Jo Partridge, Herbie Flowers and Chris Spedding, drums by Barry Morgan, George Fenton upon Autoharp, Santur and Tar, Ken 'Prof' Freeman on synthesisers, percussion by Barry De Souza, Ray Jones and Ray Cooper, Paul Hart as the piano on 'The Red Weed' and Jeff Wayne on piano and harpsichord, from the outset this was always going to be something special, but that was not the end of it. Joining them were the vocal talents David Essex as 'The Artilleryman', Phil Lynott as 'Parson Nathaniel', Julie Covington as 'Beth' the Parsons wife, Justin Hayward and Chris Thompson.

With the music covered and lyrics now in place, the album needed on more ingredient in the form of the story that was superbly written by Doreen Wayne, a full time writer. Her first novel The Love Strike set in her home town of Hull was followed by the best-seller Love Is A Well Raped Word in 1968. She also wrote for newspapers, magazines and television as well as rewriting the script for the West End musical Two Cities, based upon the Charles Dickens A Tale Of Two Cities.

Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds follows the tale of the journalist (Richard Burton) after a 'Falling Star' lands upon Horsell Common in Woking, Surrey, during the first disc, named like the books first section 'The Coming Of The Martians'. Quickly we learn it's a cylinder containing an invading army of creatures from Mars. After the cylinder has opened disgorging its alien contents, the creatures set about building vast machines that walk upon three legs. A tremendous battle unfolds on Horsell Common and a single Artilleryman (David Essex) survives to tell the tale of Fighting Machines armed with Heat Rays that wiped the army out. Another falling star is observed, landing London way so the Journalist and his new companion set off, the journalist hopes of reaching London in time to find the love of his life - Carrie. Arriving at Weybridge, they are greeted by the advancing Martian invaders as they set about destroying the towns. The journalist and the Artilleryman are separated as a Martian Fighting Machine is bought down by the guns of the British army, quickly being destroyed by the invaders. Having escaped, the journalist reaches London to find Carrie has fled the capital. As he heads for the docks he see's the mass exodus from London, millions fleeing at the Martians rampage across the city. Upon reaching the coast and seeing the paddle steamer that's taking Carrie to safety, another battle unfolds between man and Martian. The vast Fighting Machines plunge out into the sea as the pride of the Royal Navy awaits, the H.M.S Thunder Child. As the battle commences, Victory cheers turn to horror as the brave Thunder Child is lost to the oceans depths, her hull being pierced by the deathly Martians Heat Rays.

The second chapter on disc two 'The Earth Under The Martians' see's how the world has fallen to the Martians as the planets surface has no been taken over by an unearthly plant, the Red Weed. As the journalist wades through this spongy mass of growth he happens upon the body of a Parson (Phil Lynott). In the distance comes the cries of the Parsons wife (Julie Covington) as they take shelter from an approaching Fighting Machine spraying a poisonous vapour called The Black Smoke, death to all that breaths. The Parson believes the Martians are demons sent to the Earth by the Devil and feels it should be him who must confront them. With a green flash, the house they are taking shelter in collapses as a huge Martian cylinder falls from the sky, burying them under the ruins. Beth is found dead as the Parsons cries of anguish fill the air. The journalist and the Parson fight, the journalist scarred that the Parsons outcries could invite the Martians to them after they witness the Martians feeding upon humans and the arrival of a new machine, a six legged metallic giant with huge claws and a human capturing basket upon it's back. After a fight, the Parson is knocked unconscious by the journalist as a Martians claw comes into the ruins. The Parson body is dragged away and the journalist, scarred, buries himself amongst the coal and wood in the cellar. After many days of imprisonment, the journalist flee's the ruined house and finds no living souls for days. Approaching London again, he stumbles upon a familiar face, the Artilleryman and learns of a new life that seems to be starting, according to the Artilleryman. A new life that will exist - underground. The delusional dreams of the solider unnerve the journalist as he slowly watches man's empire being taken away by these creatures from another world, so after some time he leaves the Artilleryman and heads off towards the great city.

He finds London in ruins, blackened by the Black Dust, empty streets, mankind slain by the Martians, not a living soul to be seen, but the air filled with the haunting cry of a Martian Fighting Machine, calling out to it's companions. As time passes, the journalist, weary, hungry, his mind wondering, follows the Martians cry as desperation take control. He decides his only chance now is to give his life to the Martians. Scrambling to the summit of Primrose Hill, he is greeted by a stupendous site, the great city covered with Fighting Machines and there Martian inhabitants - dead. And so we learn of there demise, these invaders, so intelligent that on Mars there are no diseases, but Earth has plenty and they are overcome by Bacteria. Joyfully, the journalist tells of the triumphant return of human life in the streets again, but grave thoughts fill upper minds as questions arise on another attack from Mars. And as the journalist tells us, 'Maybe the future belongs not to us, but to the Martians'.

And so ends this great story. But no, its doesn't stop there, moving years ahead to almost present times, a landing upon Mars see's lights of some kind, green flares spurting from Mars, trailing a green mist. Each flare is observed leaving the red planet, getting closer and closer, heading towards Earth. What are they?, who are they?, our worst fears have come apparent . . . . .

Since 1978, Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds has sold over 13 million copies, stayed in the albums charts for 5 years, seen numerous hit singles including 'The Eve Of The War' and 'Forever Autumn'. The album has won Jeff Wayne two Ivor Novello Awards, the ultimate accolade for writers in the U.K. Released a best selling games for both the P.C and Playstation. In 1985 the album was released on compact disc. Remastered in 1995 to include 4 remixes. Remixed in 2000 and released as 'UllaDubUlla' that contained 7" and 12" mixes and now after almost 30 years, the album is back on top again and this time entering the top 10 album charts with this classic and much loved album, bringing us bang up to date with musical technology, the album has been mixed and placed into SA-CD 5.1 Surround Sound format, giving the listener the 'ultimate' playback experience, putting 'you' into the music. But it does not stop there. Now in production and with an expected release of early 2008, we will see a fully animated and very long awaited movie version of Jeff Wayne's The War Of The Worlds coming to cinema's world wide. Indeed, with all the fascination with this ground breaking album, re-launch and CGI movie - the Earth really does belong to the Martians.


THE COLLECTOR'S EDITION 7 DISC SET CONTENTS

CECD96000

RRP £79.99

Also Available In SA-CD Digipak Double Album Release With Extended Booklet

TWO DISC'S OF THE CLASSIC ALBUM

DPCD96000

RRP £15.99




THE COLLECTOR'S EDITION - BOOK & PACKAGING

Many will remember the glorious 16 page artwork booklet that came with the double album in 1978. The booklet was filled with 7 paintings depicting scenes from the albums story by artists Michael Trim, Geoff Taylor and Peter Goodfellow. For the 'Collector's Edition' these startling paintings have been reproduced in full colour, each one covering a double page in a hard bound book, the size of the original double album - 12 inch x 12 inch. The size of the book not only allows for these painting to shine but also to contain some 80 pages of behind the scene's pictures, The War Of The Worlds collectibles and rarities, books, records, album cast, albums complete story put into track by track category, the making of the album, large and informative biographies section and a stunning detailed insight into the disc's that contain all the rarities. The sumptuous book is lavishly illustrated throughout with much new artwork and many 'never before seen' images.

The front and back cover of the book features the magnificent painting of the 'Thunder Child' battle against the Martian Fighting Machine, lovingly created by Michael Trim. On the inside of both front and back hard covers are the specially designed 'pockets' for the 7 disc's. Conventional compact disc's and DVDs are kept in place with a circular plastic clips or prongs that can give way and snap. The Collector's Edition does not have that, instead it has pockets that keep the disc's securely in place to avoid damaging and slipping. Each disc comes with its own slip sleeve that details the disc contents and each disc is colourfully illustrated.

Disc's One & Two In SA-CD 5.1 Surround Sound

Disc One - The Coming Of The Martians - Running Time: 45.09

The Eve Of The War - Horsell Common And The Heat Ray - The Artilleryman And The Fighting Machine - Forever Autumn - Thunder Child


These disc's contain the complete album, 'The Coming Of The Martians' and 'The Earth Under The Martians', in two formats. The mix of the album for these formats give a playback of a 'stereo' mix and SA-CD mix, both glorious to the ears. Unlike previous releases, both disc's do not contain any extra material in the way of tracks such as remixes. The album appears in its near original format but as the new mix. The mix is stunning revealing sounds 'never' heard before with all sounds taken from the wealthy array of original master tapes. Each track is crystal clear and its this that gives us those sounds never heard until now. The opening narration by Richard Burton comes over as if he is actually there with you, in your room. 'The Eve Of The War' is even more creepier than ever with those familiar haunting strings now containing the rich sounds of the Harpsichord and Ken Freeman's synthesiser along to deep kettle drums. The unmistakable sounds of the Martians Heat Ray is even more chilling, its chords striking the listeners nerves in a way not heard before. After the first part of 'The Eve Of The War' has passed we move onto the narration again from Richard Burton. He tells us of the eruptions on Mars and the approach of the first lot of Martians as Justin Hayward chilling words of "The chances of anything coming from Mars are a million to one, he said". 'Horsell Common And The Heat Ray' opening bass is creepier than ever, cleaned and mixed it presents to us the horror of what is to follow as the Martians emerge from the cylinder, the metal on metal rubbing of the giant screw fills the room. Jo Partridge's guitar playing during the Heat Rays deathly assault upon mankind is haunting yet glorious to listen too. David Essex's entrance in 'The Artilleryman And The Fighting Machine' along to new additional sounds is as memorable as it was made and listened too for the first time and the appearance of the awesome Fighting Machines are strengthened by the wonderfully chilling strings and basses during the attack upon Weybridge as the vast machines sweep upon the town and its victims to the spine tingling sounds of 'ULLA', the Martians cry. As the journalist heads off to London, the beautiful 'Forever Autumn' is as moving as ever with Justin Haywards astounding performance. The opening sequence to 'The Thunder Child' is still awesome to listen too and the battleships demise brings back the sadness.

Disc Two - The Earth Under The Martians - Running Time: 49.34

The Red Weed (Part One) - The Spirit Of Man - The Red Weed (Part Two) - The Artilleryman Returns - Brave New World - Dead London
Epilogue (Part One) - Epilogue (Part Two)(NASA)


'The Earth Under The Martians' on disc two starts off with those same creepy movements of a musical vegetation in 'The Red Weed - Part One', now sounding even better, those atmospheric strings and synth tones still have the ability to send shivers down your spine. Again during 'The Spirit Of Man' we are given a wonderful array of sounds not heard until now and we feel for Beth and the journalist all over again as the Parson battles with his nerves as the Martians approach. The strings and rich and delightful to listen to during 'The Red Weed - Part Two', 'The Artilleryman Returns' and 'Brave New World'. The triumphal sounds of Ken Freeman's military march created upon the synthesiser is a pleasure to listen too and sounds just so right. Upon realising the end of the world is coming, 'Dead London' still has the power to move you along to the chilling piano chords and nightmarish calling sounds of a dying Martian. From a man wondering in his own nightmare, we are taken to a sudden change, the Martians are found - dead, and here the music suddenly bursts into a triumphant score in the 'Epilogue - Part One' as man takes control of the Earth again. As the music fades into 'Epilogue - Part Two', the closing chapter to the story and the album, we hear the voice of NASA. Familiar sounds become clear as the announcer describes to us a mass of green gas, hurtling towards us. Computers buzz in the background as Ken Freeman's synthesisers fill the air, as in the blink of an eye, everything is suddenly stilled.

Disc Three - 'Deconstructing Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds'
The Making Of DVD


Running Time: 92 Minutes - Audio: Stereo - Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - Language: English - Region: 0

Additional Features: Biography Section & Photo Gallery


This is truly a remarkable in-depth look into the making of Jeff Wayne's musical masterpiece that is very rarely seen. Hosted by Jeff Wayne himself, Jeff takes us on a guided tour of his album, stopping off at all the tracks, showing us and telling us how each and every track came to be made and used for the album. We even go into Jeff's own studio, watch him perform some of the sections of score upon his grand piano, watch how tracks are taken apart and learn how certain notes were made and created upon the instruments. From the start of the documentary, Jeff takes us to many locations that inspired him all those years ago such as Primrose Hill in London and Horsell Common in Surrey and we are treated many times to some stunning computer generated images (CGI) footage and rare videos from the late 1970 during the album and singles releases. The documentary is put into sections, starting off with 'The Eve Of The War' going right through to the NASA Epilogue and the aftermath of the album. A stunning visual feast for any music lover and fan of The War Of The Worlds.


Disc Four - The Remixes 1979 - 2005

Running Time: 74.53


A wonderful collection of 17 of the best remixes that have appeared since the albums launch in 1978. Each track like the album has been remastered to give the listener the ultimate playback experience. The tracks include many favourites, some taken from the 2000 album 'UllaDubUlla' and the best selling 1989 remix by Ben Liebrand version of 'The Eve Of The War', the 1979 Steve Thompson disc remix of 'The Eve Of The War', 3 brand new mixes by Jeff Wayne featuring music from both his albums The War Of The Worlds and Spartacus, the latter being released in 1992 featuring Anthony Hopkins and Catherine Zeta Jones.

Disc Five - The Coming Of The Martians - Revisited

Running Time: 58.29

Rarities & Out-takes From Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds


This is disc one of three disc's that contains a huge amount of rarities and studio out-takes during the making of the classic album during May 18th 1976 and June 13th 1977. This collection gives us that rare chance to listen to what was going on, how the band put the tracks together, Richard Burton's narration and his many mistakes, which are a delight and funny to listen too. "So what do we have in this musical feast", well its hard for me to start as there is just so much, but here is a small selection of what's on the disc and other disc's. Disc One of rarities opens with the 'four narrators', Richard Burton, Anthony Quinn, Teofilo Martinez and Curd Jurgens, each one narrating the album since its release in English, Latin American Spanish, Spanish and German.

'The Eve Of The War' tracks are stunning, with original unheard (until now) opening and band studio season including Richard Burton haunting narration that contains 'new' words. A stripped down mix of 'The Eve Of The War' which is truly fantastic and the very funny and contagious laugh from Barry Morgan that sets everyone else off laughing in the studio. Next we move onto 'Horsell Common And The Heat Ray' and Richard Burton's many attempts to get to grips with the narration during the appearance of the Martians. 'Horsell Common And The Heat Ray' (early version) plays to us how the track first sounded along to more narration from Richard Burton. We also have the delight of listening to the awesome Heat Ray guitar sounds from Jo Partridge playing along with Jeff Wayne on the piano. One special treat on this disc is during the opening of the original unused intro to 'The Artilleryman And The Fighting Machine' in the form of not only artillery guns sounding off in the distance but the special guest appearance of 'Ozzie The Owl'. Before we hear the chilling bass guitar at the opening of 'The Artilleryman' and before Richard Burton's narration begins with "The hammering from the pit, the pounding of guns grew louder" we get to hear Ozzie in full swing, calling out above the battle cries.

Suprisingly I did not realise that 'Forever Autumn' started life as a 30 second TV jingle back in 1969 by Paul Vigrass and Gary Osbourne, but it's here for all to listen too including the original single release in 1972, early band version for The War Of The Worlds album, mingled in-between numerous bar counts - again those funny moments when one looses one's count. Next we are introduced to sections removed from the album, sounds of paperboys calling out in the streets of London as the Martians advance and the mass panic, screams of those trying to board the ferry. More removed out-takes of dialogue heard on the disc includes people reactions to the invaders "What ugly brutes" and "Do you see them".

Two tracks appear of the original takes on 'Thunder Child' before Chris Thompson was used, moving onto the opening narration of disc two of the album - 'The Under The Martians' and the deadly 'Red Weed' early version. Here Richard Burton gives us another fine performance and yet more humorous mistakes during the 'Red Weed' section. Jeff's "Worth A Listen" Red Weed out-take is very funny as we hear Jeff 'messing' about on the piano. The disc finishes with one of the original radio commercials from 1978 which is indeed a pleasure to listen too after all this time.

Disc Six - The Earth Under The Martians - Revisited

Running Time: 72.22

Rarities & Out-takes From Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds


Like the first disc of rarities, we are lovingly treated to yet more stunning, funny and rare scores and out-takes from the album. The opening track is a rarity from the archives, 'Parson Nathaniel', the original unused song that was replaced with 'The Spirit Of Man'. 'The Spirit Of Man' follows, this being an early version, unused and with acting parts from Richard Burton, Phil Lynott and Julie Covington. We have early versions again of 'The Spirit Of Man', guide vocals and a funny moment of Jeff and his microphone that does not work. During this disc, we have a large section devoted to the singing and acting talents of Phil Lynott and includes many rare out-takes in the studio, a beautiful insight into 'Thin Lizzies' leading man, the most memorable are the 'scream' out-takes which are hilarious "so there was this fella and he goes into this pub - Arrghhhhhhhhh". We hear more narration unheard before from Richard Burton and some excellent guitar rifts and acoustic recordings from 'The Spirit Of Man' followed with more acting parts from Julie Covington.

Next we have 'The Artllerymans Returns' opening with unused parts and the excellent acting parts from Richard Burton and David Essex. Its at this part of the disc we get to hear the many out-takes of David Essex during performing as it leads to a wonderful solo piano performance of 'Brave New World' by Jeff Wayne and an early band take and more David Essex out-takes "I've got a plan". Following all this there is a wonderful acoustic version of 'Brave New World' featuring Jo Partridge, Barry Morgan, Ken Freeman, Jeff Wayne and Ray Cooper and an alternative version. The disc finishes off with many studio out-takes of Richard Burton and David Essex, both in character as they talk about the building of a new world under the ground, featuring a lot unused acting and narration and one more radio commercial from 1978.

Disc Seven - The Earth Under The Martians - Revisited

Running Time: 63.02 - (including narration)

Rarities & Out-takes From Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds

Features The Original Narration & Acting Parts (unabridged) - Running Time: 36.18


The last and final disc of this sumptuous Collector's Edition features the early piano demo of the chilling 'Dead London' and early band run-through featuring Herbie Flowers, Jeff Wayne, Roy Jones, Jo Partridge, Chris Spedding, Barry De Souza and Ken Freeman. In this take, Jo Partridges 'ULLA' guitar and voice box effect sound as scary as ever, filling the room with the dying sound of the Martians as we move on to Jeff doing his bar count for 'Dead London' and Richard Burton's narration, bringing to us the final moments of the Martians about London. 'Epilogue - Part One' is that of an early band take featuring Jeff Wayne and Richard Burton with much never heard before narration, chilling, moving yet joyful.

Included on this disc are some of the unused alternate NASA Epilogue out-takes by Jerry Wayne.

". . . . today as we all celebrate their safe landing on Mars. The President has added his congratulations to those pouring in from all over the world. The magnitude of this achievement cannot be underestimated. There seems to be a slight hitch. Transmission been interrupted from one of our spacecraft. Now we seem to have lost both craft. Im sure it's only temporary. Everything is OK. We've just sighted a flare . . . Are they supposed to release flares? Tom, check it out. Now the flare can be seen with the naked eye: bright green, drawing a green mist behind it - coming closer. Its like a falling star, a beautiful and. . . . "

Next we have four lots of out-takes from the studio recordings featuring Anthony Quinn during the NASA Epilogue. Like the Richard Burton out-takes, even the best make mistakes, funny and pleasant to listen too.

The closing section of this disc features what is truly a work of art, a rarity, and what I can only describe as a The War Of The Worlds fans dream. For the first time we are able to listen to the original narration with acting parts, unabridged and lasting over 36 minutes. This is Richard Burton at his chilling best. Below are a few examples of what can be heard, never used in the final edit of the album in 1978.

Richard Burton: 'Horsell Common And The Heat Ray' - "In the afternoon, a company of soldiers came through and deployed along the edge of the common to form a cordon. I felt more secure now that the army was in control. even though the hammering continued and there was a steady streamer of smoke from the pit. That evening, a falling star with a trail of green mist landed in the woods with a flash like Summer lighting, this was the 2nd cylinder. At dawn came a thud of a gun from the common, then there was a violent crash that shook the ground, houses slid down into ruin and I realised with horror that my home was now within range of the Martians Heat Ray. Overhead, dark clouds were driving fast, and then startlingly it was as though the clouds had been pierced a thread of green fire - it was a 3rd falling star."

Richard Burton: 'The Red Weed - Part One' - "Where ever there was a stream, the Red Weed clung and grew with frightening varaciousness. Its claw like fronds choking the movement of the water. Then it began to creep like a slimy red animal across the land, covering field and ditch and tree and hedgerow with living scarlet feelers, crawling, crawling. It was impossible to recognise the route I had taken only yesterday, so engulfed was it by the Red Weed, but I placed the sun behind me and started across a field. It was like walking upon gigantic blood drops. I stumbled knee deep and then neck deep and had to fight my way out of this menacing devouring red mass. I kept to the road after that, walking steadily towards London. As I approached the little village of Latchingdon, I longed for the familiar site of its cool green fields and hedges sweet with dog roses, but alas the Red Weed sprouted here with terrifying abundance. At Cold Norton, the walls of ruined cottages were alive with moving red fingers, and at Billericay everything had shrivelled and died, leaving nothing but a vast red swamp. I new a terrible fear. The Red Weed had formed a crimson blanket over our world and it threatened to smoother all mankind. "

Richard Burton: 'Dead London' - "I marched recklessly towards the titan, and then as I drew nearer, I saw that a multitude of black birds were circling and clustering about the hood. At that my heart gave a bound and I began running along the road. The thought that had flashed into my mind grew real, grew credible. I felt no fear only a wild trembling exultation as I ran up the hill towards the motionless monster, out of the hood hung red shreds at which the hungry birds now pecked and tore. In another moment I had scrambled up the earthen rampart to the crest of Primrose Hill and the Martians camp was below me, a mighty space it was filled with gigantic machines. And scattered about it some in there overturned Fighting Machines some in there crab like Handling Machines and a dozen of them stark and silent laying in a row were the Martians - DEAD - slain after all mans devices had failed by the humblest things upon the Earth, Bacteria, minute invisible bacteria. These germs have plagued us since life began here, but through millions of years we have developed a resistance to them becoming immune to many and succumbing to non without a struggle, But there are no bacteria on Mars. Directly these invaders arrived and drank and fed, our microscopic allies attacked them. From that moment they were doomed. Mans resistance has been bought at the cost of a billion lives."

Almost 30 years since it's release, Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds still remains today as the most definitive version of H.G.Wells classic novel. Loved by millions with an album cover regarded as one of the most iconic covers of the late 1970s. Its sweeping sounds of orchestral strings, guitars, percussion and Richard Burton's chilling narration still captures people attention and imagination. With the 'Collector's Edition', Jeff Wayne has given us a look into the album, its making of, development, with a huge array of behind-the-scenes footage thought by many as either lost or never existed, everything a fan would want and more. You don't have to be a sci-fi fanatic or even a The War Of The Worlds fanatic to enjoy this set. The Set will delight all that hear, read and view it. Perfectly packaged, presented and an audible feast for the ears and eye's, both Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds - Collector's Edition and double Digipak Edition will be loved and cherished for years to come.


Jonathan Smith
www.waroftheworldsonline.com
&
www.thewaroftheworlds.com

To order your copy of the stunning 7 disc 'Collector's Edition', use the direct link below and you  can save ££££s from the RRP over at the 'Official' Jeff Wayne Ebay E-Commerce store.

RRP £79.99

Jeff Wayne's E-Commerce Store Price £71.99

Saving of 10% 

 http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=4744433742&category=43661&tc=photo

 

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Posted 03/08/2005 23:31


Supreme Being
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If only i could afford it!!

THE MILKBOTTLE, matzo

"LOOK, WHAT DID I TELL YOU"-the artilleryman

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Posted 04/08/2005 13:05


Supreme Being
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aw will ya look at that! a big shiny book aswell! id love that edition!
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Posted 11/08/2005 17:57
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I have just received today this edition, which I ordered from this site (in just four days, and delivered in Spain!). What an incredible artifact! Probably, the most gorgeous reedition ever made of any album in the world in any style. Jaw-dropping. Over the top.  I know the price is not what you might consider affordable, but when you have the thing in your hands you cannot help to think that it is really worth it. This is not a record, this is a work of art. I am quite sure that in a few years we will see this edition being traded at Ebay for a lot of money; not that I will part with mine, but even as an investment it should be an interesting purchase...

From now on, I will consider the definitive proof of the lack of intelligent life on Mars, that no martians are reported to have ordered this edition so far. It really defines its own category when it comes to music packages. And I promise I have no relationship with Columbia or Mr. Wayne!

JJ

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Posted 12/08/2005 20:54
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I have just purchased the Collector's Edition (I had to go to London to buy it) and I am so impressed! The alternate takes of the score and the additional narration (including the Spanish and German versions) are just outstanding.  I love listening to Richard Burton, it is like he is in the room with you telling the story just for you.

It was expensive but worth every penny.  The artwork is fantastic and the cover is beautiful.  I was almost reluctant to play each disc because the anticipation of the additional material was almost as good as listening to it.

Forever Autumn was one of the first records I ever bought and at the time I had no idea what The War of the Worlds was all about.  Someone loaned me a copy of the album and I bought my own copy right away.  I never tire of hearing this music and everytime I listen I hear something new.  I only wish that there had been scenes between Carrie and the Narrator on her return after the Martians had perished.

I hope a new generation of fans appreciate WOTW, I will always treasure the Collector's Edition.

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Posted 12/08/2005 21:07


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A German version? Sehr schön. Who is the narrator? The songs are not translated, are they?



Calmar

-------------------------------------

Not a forum moderator of the 'biggest' The War Of The Worlds site's on the net:

http://www.thewaroftheworlds.com

Below the thunders of the upper deep;
Far far beneath in the abysmal sea,
His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleep
The Kraken sleepeth
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Posted 12/08/2005 23:47
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Quote: A German version? Sehr schön. Who is the narrator? The songs are not translated, are they?

The songs are not translated but the narrator's part is spoken in German by Curt Jurgens and in Spanish by Anthony Quinn!

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Posted 11/09/2005 20:07
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THE COLLECTORS EDITION IS A MUST HAVE ITEM!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Posted 12/09/2005 01:06




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There are two Spanish versions, actually. The Latin American Spanish one narrated by Anthony Quinn and a European Spanish version narrated by Teafilo Martinez.

I've also heard reports of a Dutch version (not to be confused with the rare Dutch release but in English), created by a radio station, that was broadcast years ago in Holland but never released as an album.


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Le Grand Fromage! (Le New Generation!)

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Posted 12/09/2005 09:34




Supreme Being
Supreme Being

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Active: 07/02/2013
Posts: 351
Dutch version? Surely someone must be able to track it down!
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