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Performing Musician Interview with Gaetan Schurrer
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Posted 10/06/2009 02:19




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The War Of The Worlds
Jeff Wayne's musical on tour
Thirty years after Jeff Wayne first put H.G. Wells' science fiction epic to music, he and his musicians prepare to embark upon a 2009 Anniversary Tour to celebrate his 1978 recording, along with a full supporting cast, a barrage of equipment and a multitude of special effects.
Nigel Humberstone

It's fair to say that nobody could have predicted the longevity of Jeff Wayne's ambitious concept album, inspired by H.G. Wells' The War Of The Worlds, when it was first released in 1978. The recording, along with its hit singles 'The Eve Of The War' and 'Forever Autumn', has achieved staggering success, ranking as one of the best-selling and longest-running musical works in chart history. Interest was revived in 2005 with a painstakingly remastered, remixed and repackaged double album version, which pushed worldwide sales to 15 million. At the same time, the spectacular live musical version was announced, with worldwide tours during 2006 and 2007.
Next year sees a celebratory 30th Anniversary Tour that pushes the live stage performance towards ever-greater technological boundaries.
Amazingly, nine of the musicians who took part in the original recordings, including guitarist Chris Spedding and bassist Herbie Flowers, will be part of the 10-piece Black Smoke Band that Jeff Wayne conducts alongside the 46-piece ULLAdubULLA string section. A full supporting cast, including Justin Hayward, perform amidst a huge CGI-animated projection, 35ft Martian Fighting Machine, pyrotechnics and a 3D floating hologram of Richard Burton.
Multiple roles

All of the live parts are backed up by normally-muted parts in the backing track, so if anything goes wrong during performance the recorded part can be un-muted and the show can go on with nothing missing.
Engineer, programmer, remixer and musician Ga tan Schurrer has worked with Jeff Wayne for over 20 years. He was given the complex task of realising the work as a musical score that would allow synchronisation between the live performance, visuals and effects. "My involvement in this production is actually multi-faceted, as I work behind the scenes on the pre-production as well as being a band member during the tour," explains Schurrer. "My brief and role, from the start, was to take on the challenge of translating the studio production into a live show that could be played and toured on a back-to-back basis. The bulk of the pre-production work was completed ahead of the first tour in 2006, and for 2009 my role involves updating everything according to any wishes, fixing anything we found to be defective previously, and implementing any and all improvements or changes being made to the show's audio."
Schurrer is credited as a 'programmer', a job description that does little to reflect the complexities and depth of his involvement. "'Programmer' has been an unfortunate term," he admits, "that has been used for many years to describe people such as myself who found themselves, through the increased use of computer technology, doing multiple jobs for which they were not always properly credited. Programming in my case has involved running Pro Tools, Logic and Live DAWs, writing, producing, engineering, recording, mixing, arranging, sound design, synthesizers and other such devices, programming, performing, troubleshooting, tech support, studio building, management and maintenance, to name a few.
Before the first tour in 2006, I used the Pro Tools files I created during the surround remix and complete album rebuild in 2004/5 as a basis to build the audio content of the show. This involved working out — taking into consideration what was available to us as a band line-up — which parts could be played live and which had to be relegated to the backing track. It was impossible to play all the parts live, due to many factors, such as Richard Burton being unavailable for live performance, the limited numbers of band members available, and the sheer size and content of the original 1978 production. This was quite a daunting task to start with, and I was rather pleased when it started coming together after a lot of days spent in Pro Tools shuffling parts and tracks around.
One more of my responsibilities was to get the percussion and keyboard rigs set up for our needs, so working in conjunction with Julia and the keyboard players, I programmed all the units, tweaking them to their liking to enable them to perform the required parts.
I was very involved with getting every musician in the band familiar and comfortable with their parts, spending time with each of them in the studio in order to do so. I also coordinated the preparation of the music parts, liaising with and preparing all the relevant files for the people involved in creating the parts we would eventually load into our music pads. This was a rather involved task, including the making of separate Pro Tools bounces for each musician so that everything could be transcribed to paper, double-checked and then adjusted to each musician's preference and rig.
Still under my programmer title, I also coordinated just about every aspect of the production as far as audio was concerned, being the point of call for all musicians, stage people, video/CGI company, and generally Jeff's 'person in the know'. Also, with our Head of Sound and FOH engineer for 2006 and 2007, Gary Langan [who also mixed the 2005 surround and stereo version of the album with Schurrer], I was involved in visualising the concept and specifying the sound system required for our show, as well as advising on which company we eventually chose for sound reinforcement — Major Tom."
New challenges

In addition to his many other responsibilities, Ga tan Schurrer plays the lead line in 'Horsell Common And The Heat Ray' on the Persian tar.
"Each tour presents its own new challenges," says Schurrer. "New guest artistes require adaptation of some of the material. For example, we have to drop the key of one of the songs by a semitone for next year's performances. This involves quite a bit of pre-production work to make sure it all works seamlessly and is as transparent a change as possible while retaining the original intent of the composition. Another area is that Jeff and I are always looking at ways to improve the audience's experience by modifying anything that makes it work better as a live show. We are going to make some structural changes to our second act, for example, in order to be able to reintroduce all of our guest artistes both sonically and visually ahead of their exit bows. We are also constantly updating and upgrading our special effects, including pyrotechnics, lighting and video/CGI, and often this affects what is happening in the soundtrack, which is my responsibility."
Synchronicity

Jeff Wayne recorded the original musical version of TWOTW in 1978.
One of Schurrer's key areas of contribution to the production has been the synchronisation of timings and communication required between all parties involved to make the show run smoothly. "As it was both Jeff's and my wish to make this live show feel and sound as close to the original album we all know and love as possible, I took the decision to use the original 1976 performance timings," he says. "I knew this meant an unbelievable amount of labour, but it had to be done in order to get what I wanted.
I spent more time than I care to admit creating a click track that follows the recorded 1976 performance exactly. I did have a little bit of a head start, because I had created a rough tempo map during the rebuild of the album in 2004 in order to be able to have delay-based plug-ins sync to the music when mixing. But now I had to be a lot more detailed — basically entering a tempo change entry manually for every bar played, and sometimes even every beat or 16th note — to follow every last tempo movement from Jeff's conducting of the band in 1976! In some of the songs, it wasn't too bad, basically just following the fluctuations of the live band as they sped up into a chorus or slowed down for a bridge section. But with some of the compositions, such as 'The Red Weed' and 'Dead London', the click track is nothing short of a work of art. And even then it takes some learning, practice and getting used to in order to be able to perform to it! There are over 1200 bars of music in Act 1 and almost 1400 bars in Act 2!"
Another important, but rarely used means of communication was the provision of bar counters on stage. "My reasoning behind this was that it would be very difficult for anyone on stage to count bars from beginning to end," explains Schurrer, "especially in our environment with lights and smoke and pyrotechnics, not to mention a three-tonne Martian Fighting Machine stomping down in the middle of the band! Since the whole show backing track is based on two Pro Tools sessions running to SMPTE timecode, and these sessions contain the tempo map I created in order to make the click track, I saved a copy of each session without any tracks or audio content, and we load this on a small laptop rig backstage. We then sync it to our master timecode and show Pro Tools' Big Counter window. And I got the video people to take an output from that laptop screen, blow it up to show only the counter, and distribute it to a number of small video monitors strategically placed on stage so that every performer can see at least two. This way, every performer can relax, and a quick glance at the monitor is all you need to be ready for your next cue or update your music pad to the current page.
In terms of synchronisation, the SMPTE 25-frames-per-second timecode I generated from Pro Tools is the master code that runs the show. The first act starts at one hour, and the second at 02:00:00:00.
The master code is recorded in the backing track system [see below], and is then output and distributed to the bar counter rig, FOH and monitors desks, video/CGI world and lighting. The way the show runs is very simple. The stage manager gets everyone on stage, gets the nod from Jeff once he is ready, gives the 'go' signal to our keyboard tech, who starts the backing track system. The show then starts with a pre-recorded intro, followed by Burton's opening speech, at the end of which the click track counts Jeff and the orchestra into the famous opening chords."
Backing track and backup

The orchestra for TWOTW comprises the 10-piece Black Smoke Band and 46-piece ULLAdubULLA string section.
"Once I'd assigned all the parts that were to be played live, I was left with a number of sounds and performances that had to become our backing track," says Schurrer. "For example, the acoustic guitar part is doubled throughout most of the original album, but it wasn't feasible for us to have two acoustic guitar players. As such, I made sure that the more interesting part is played live and the doubling of it is still Jo Partridge's original 1976 performance. Similarly, the bass guitar had two parts in a few places, and so Herbie plays live to his original 1976 second track. The list goes on, but upon completion I was pleasantly surprised to find out that the backing track is actually very sparse throughout, other than for the mostly constant second acoustic guitar part, with the meat of the performance coming from the band."
Built-in redundancy

Neil Angilley, keyboard player — there are four keyboard rigs in TWOTW production.
Schurrer has built redundancy into the playback system: all the parts that are played live are also found (as their original 1976 recordings) in the playback system on separate tracks. "These are fed into a small mixer that sits next to me on stage," he says. "The output of this mixer goes to a pair of open channels on the FOH desk. Under normal circumstances, all of these are muted for the duration of the show. If at any time something goes wrong during performance, such as a keyboard rig crashing or a guitar player breaking a string or losing sound for whatever reason, I then instantly un-mute the appropriate track and the show goes on. As soon as the musician is back on-line, the backup part is muted again and the sound reverts to the live performance. This was a requirement, because most of the parts played live are lead lines, and if any were to go missing it would sound dreadful, like a huge hole in the mix.
Another redundancy factor is the fact that we have recorded performances for each of our guest artistes. This has been an invaluable help during rehearsal and soundcheck, allowing the band and orchestra to rehearse on their own as well as providing a reference to the artistes whenever needed. It is also in place should an artiste's microphone and backup fail — something that happened to us once in Australia, due to radio interference from a large football match final broadcast.
Since all parts were created from my original Pro Tools sessions of the album, I opted to use a Pro Tools rig all the way into rehearsals for ease of cueing, as well as giving me full control over any required modifications I, Jeff or any band member felt were necessary or helpful. Once the backing track is locked in at the end of rehearsals, it is transferred from Pro Tools to our tour playback rack, which consists of four Tascam 24-track hard disk recorders, synchroniser and Technical Earth custom-made switching unit. Four recorders for two reasons: I need 48 tracks (two Tascam 24T) for my backing tracks because we wanted to retain control over all the sounds, rather than premixing, and the other two as a redundant array. The system is amazing. All playback units play in sync, and if either main master or slave unit fails, the Technical Earth device switches instantly and virtually silently swaps all audio outputs to the backup units!"
Boundary sound

The many special effects of the performance keep Chris Cunningham pretty busy at the lighting desk.
The War Of The Worlds is renowned for pushing the boundaries of technology, both with the original recordings in 1978 and the 5.1 remix and remastering in 2005. However, with the live performance there are still technical limits, as Schurrer explains. "One of the boundaries we have found to be pushing against is the use of surround sound in the live environment," he says. "Apparently, very few acts are making use of it, but we felt it added another dimension to our show. It works better in some venues than others, due to rigging capabilities and space constraints. But it is amazing when it works properly. I always enjoy watching members of the audience sitting near the surround monitors duck at the first instance of the Heat Ray or Ulla sounds! This is one thing that live technology seems to be slow to catch up with. I would love to be able to play sounds and pan them in surround from stage, but this is currently a rather difficult option. As a workaround, I bounced the sounds I wanted to be in surround in Pro Tools with the desired panning to our backing track system, and we output these into the surround monitors.
Another boundary is the limited amount of sound we can fly for surround. It's a combination of rigging issues and cost implications, but I would like to see a more balanced live surround system where the discrepancy between main stereo and surround monitors wasn't so extreme. Because of this discrepancy, we are limiting the amount of sound sent to the surround.
The other technological wonders in our show aren't in the audio department. They are Richard Burton's head, which started life as a projection onto a giant head sculpture and progressed last year into a holographic projection onto a brand new kind of translucent film, and the MFM (Martian Fighting Machine) — a three-tonne amalgam of hydraulics, hi-tech lights, smoke and electronic equipment, wood and other fancy materials. Also amazing is the 80ft-wide projection of mixed live video and CGI, which gives the show a lot of dynamics, even for the farthest away seats in any venue!"
Ken Freeman

The musicians all use FreeHand Systems Music Pads — electronic notation displays that allow them to make their own rehearsal marks and turn 'virtual' pages by footswitch.
Another particular challenge was how to recreate most of Ken Freeman's original multitracked synth parts, which form such an integral part of the album. "I knew that Ken's synths of choice were the ARP Odyssey, the Yamaha CS80 and his own Freeman String Machine," recalls Schurrer. "The first two already existed in plug-in form as GMedia's Oddity and Arturia's CS80-V. What I did was to get Ken Freeman to come into the studio to help me recreate his sounds. Ken, 30 years on, was able to reproduce most of the sounds just from memory! All it took was to play him the original sound, and in a couple of minutes of tweaking the knobs of the relevant synth (using the mouse, as these were plug-ins), the sound would be back just as it existed in 1976! Pretty impressive stuff, and on top of it he's one of the nicest people I've ever met. For the String Machine sounds, I used the Spectrasonics Atmosphere plug-in, which gave me a close enough rendition of a String Machine synth. I also used the Native Instruments Kontakt plug-in as a sampler for a few sounds that were impractical to attempt to recreate live, and sampled the originals instead. One example is the 'bling-blong' sound in 'The Spirit Of Man'."
Muse Receptor
Once Schurrer had all those presets recreated and saved, he got a Muse Receptor unit on loan to try it out, as he didn't fancy using computers on stage to run the plug-ins. "I was suitably impressed with its performance, although the programming of all the sounds in a way that would be instantly accessible in the way we needed them for our show proved to be a little bit of a nightmare," he admits. "This was due to some of the limitations of the software when it came to being able to control the relevant parameters from two keyboards simultaneously on multiple sound instances. We did get around it in the end, but as we hit rehearsals in 2006 we started having some reliability issues. This was quite scary, as we hadn't toured the production yet and no one in the live team seemed to have any experience of the Receptors. I did attempt building an alternative rig using an Apple Mac G5 and Ableton Live, but that was falling over before it even could do half of what the Receptor was doing! So with some frantic phone calls and some help from Muse Research, I modified my settings and split the programming into less complex sections, and managed to get enough reliability to see us through our first tour."
In 2007, a Receptor software update allowed Schurrer to re-program them from scratch, and all units were upgraded to the latest motherboards and faster RAM. "We also added a third unit for Keys 3, and the GMedia Virtual String Machine plug-in allowed me to recreate more faithful versions of Ken's original sounds. In the Keys 3 rig, I also used the Native Instruments Akoustik Piano plug-in and the EastWest Colossus library for the harpsichord sound of 'The Eve Of The War'."
Schurrer still had a number of reliability issues in 2007, prompting him to rethink the Receptors approach for the upcoming tour. "I think they are great at what they do, but unfortunately still have some serious software limitations when it comes to assigning MIDI controllers. For 2009, I will be researching and experimenting with both Ableton Live and Apple's Mainstage. Either program allows a lot more programming flexibility and will hopefully afford better reliability.
As far as some of the more layered sounds are concerned, I found the best way was to leave most of the layers in the backing track system and have the live keyboards play the lead part over it. This gives us the best of both worlds: visually, you can see the part being played (the lead part being the loudest), you get the added excitement of the live performance, and the playback layers give you the richness of sound and the authenticity of Ken's original performance."
Teamwork and respect
For Schurrer, the live show, as with the album, is really a labour of love, and he confesses to having become intimately familiar with Jeff's compositions and emotive melodies over the years, which has instilled immense respect for all involved. "Two people especially have contributed enormously to the sound of TWOTW," acknowledges Schurrer, "Ken Freeman and Jo Partridge. I want to take this opportunity to take a bow to both of these amazing musicians, who injected such soul and feeling in this work, as well as giving due respect to all the others involved. You guys all did a grand job, and it has been an honour for me to be allowed to help bring this epic rendition to a wider audience." 0

Jeff Wayne — familiar sounds; new technology
Jeff Wayne's personal life must be difficult to separate from the all-encompassing nature that TWOTW has created. PM spoke to him at a time when he was auditioning guest artistes for the 2009 tour and negotiating "major new ingredients" that he was reluctantly unable to discuss. Naturally, he still gets excited by the whole project: "I do, because between the relaunch and its original release, with the exception of a couple of club remixes and a PC and Playstation game that was built around the album, I actually hadn't returned to TWOTW in all those years. So it was very fresh when we came to remix it and to turn it into the multimedia live show that it's become. It was like starting again. In truth, it's a project I created that's now in a living form and we keep trying to top the last tour in terms of the ingredients."
Sounds of the time
However, this technological progression does not include attempts to update the sounds that millions of listeners know and love. "The decision, when we started touring, was not to change," affirms Wayne. "Because it was an album recorded in the mid-'70s, the things like the drum sounds, that place it in a very definite period of time, should not be dramatically changed. We wanted to keep it familiar to those who know the album or might come to see it as a live piece for the first time.
It's not to say that we don't apply modern production techniques when we make the show, but what we haven't done is bring in a new drummer or drum sample of hip-hop grooves that might be the beat of the day just to show that we've kept up with modernity. What we've done on the live performances is to replicate, in the most positive way, the sounds that are familiar on the record. But we do use all the modern gear to give it the freshest, crispest sound, and we build from there."
Paperless production
One particular innovation that Jeff Wayne was quick to recognise and take advantage of since 2006 is the FreeHand Systems Music Pad — a music reader with bespoke software, which allows users to make their own notation. These have proven to be a godsend in the production, as the alternative of having reams of paper sheets and associated lighting was problematic with the aesthetics of the stage presentation.
"The Music Pads are pretty unique at the moment," insists Wayne. "I think we're the first, certainly in Europe, to tour with anything of this size, and they work flawlessly. We even added on extra ones. They are very elegant. You have options as to how you wish to use them — for example, page turning, which you can do with a foot pedal. I use touch, with just my finger touching the screen, because from a conductor's point of view I'm moving around quite a lot on the podium and in rehearsals I found I kept knocking the pedal off. Drummers can use a MIDI controller to turn pages, but you also have the ability to edit with a stylus — especially useful when you are in rehearsals and there is a particular note, correction or bit of text that you want to highlight. You can change the colour of the background, and it's backlit so you don't need lights above it — and from the audience's point of view, it means there's a lot less light that detracts from the stage itself.
The company we acquired them from has come up with a new addition (not a replacement) called the Maestro, which is twice the size. And again, from the conductor's point of view, is most useful, because you're turning pages less and see more of your score. The Maestro also allows you to wirelessly talk to any of the other music pads. For example, if somebody discovers there's a wrong note in the part, I can change it on my score and it will change it for all the other musician's parts where it's applicable, wirelessly."

The War Of The Worlds on tour — musicians and equipment
TWOTW is a technical production and, as Ga tan Schurrer explains, the extensive equipment reflects this.
Drums:
"Gordon Marshall used an acoustic drum kit in 2006, and an electronic Roland kit in 2007. We went down the electronic route in an attempt to make our stage more silent, as well as giving the audience a better view (Gordy's acoustic drums have to be screened), but unfortunately ran into a couple of issues. The Roland electronic hi-hats weren't up to the challenge and triggered erratically, so the hats went back to acoustic. Also, Gordy found that he could not 'hit' the snare in the same way with the electronic drum and this was actually hurting him physically, as TWOTW is a very demanding performance in the drums chair, so we also reverted to an acoustic snare drum. For 2009, we are reviewing this and are considering going hybrid — back to the acoustic drum kit, as it provided the best sound overall, but using electronic cymbals, as they were an improvement because of their miking, high-frequency content and better decay definition."
Percussion/harp:
"With Julia Thornton, we found an absolute jewel of a musician who is not only able to play tuned and un-tuned percussion, but is also a harp virtuoso! Jeff therefore decided to add the harp, both as a sonic and visual improvement, even though it wasn't an instrument used on the original album.
In the original recordings, a marimba, vibraphone and xylophone were used in many of Jeff's arrangements. When we started rehearsing in 2006, we actually had those three instruments set up, but found that they were problematic. They simply took too big an area to fit on our stage. Also, their acoustic nature meant that we had to use microphones, and that was a problem, as these were picking up more drums spill than the actual instruments' sound! As a result, we opted to use a MalletKAT percussion MIDI controller instead, attached to a Roland Phantom XR sound module.
For percussion, a pair of African drums of unknown origin were used in the 1976 recordings (especially in 'The Eve Of The War') that had a very specific sound. In 2006, we tried many different drums and ended up settling on a pair of random wooden drums with cow skins we actually hired from one of the rehearsal room's technicians. But we weren't completely satisfied, as they didn't quite sound like the album. So last year I set out to get this right. I sampled the sounds from the album recordings and programmed the samples into the Phantom XR module. Then I bought a pair of djembe drums with broken skins. I cut a circle out of the skins and custom-installed a Roland PD85BK drum pad in each djembe. Using a Trigger-to-MIDI interface and a MIDI Merge box, we are now able to play the Phantom XR from both the MalletKAT and the custom-made MIDI djembes. Julia also plays shaker, tambourine, orchestral bass drum, a gong and her harp — all acoustic instruments."
Bass:
"Herbie Flowers still plays the same Fender Jazz bass guitar he bought in 1959 in New York and used in the 1976 recordings of TWOTW."
Acoustic guitar:
"Andy Holdsworth has been our acoustic guitar virtuoso since 2007 and will be with us again in 2009. He uses a variety of guitars, but not being a guitarist myself, I am not positive I can remember the exact brand or models."
Lead guitar:
"Chris Spedding is using a number of guitars, acoustic and electric, throughout the performance. All the electrics are going through a Line 6 POD (Pro version, I believe), and a volume pedal is used to control dynamics when Richard Burton is speaking. I actually spent time in the studio back in 2006 with Chris and our then second guitarist, Laurie Wisefield, to program all the required sounds in the PODs, listening and comparing to each original sound recorded in the '70s."
Lead guitar 2/rhythm guitar:
"Huw Davies, in his role as second guitarist, also uses the same POD configuration with a selection of guitars. He also performs the Voice Box — a guitar pedal that employs a mic and a rubber tube held in the mouth to modulate the guitar sound with his voice, similarly to a vocoder. This is used to great effect in 'Horsell Common And The Heat Ray', doing what we know as the 'waaoowaa' sound, and is also used to reproduce the familiar Martian cry 'Ulla' sound originally created and performed by Jo Partridge in 1976. Huw also plays the mandolin in 'Forever Autumn'."
Keyboards:
There are four keyboard rigs in TWOTW production.
Keys 1 and 2
"Each of these rigs consists of one Receptor unit, two CME UF6 keyboards, two sustain pedals, two expression pedals and a volume pedal. Both keyboard's MIDI outputs are connected to the Receptor via a MIDI Merge box. There are two keyboards, as both players play layered or consecutive lines in a number of places."
Keys 3
"This rig was different in 2006, but since 2007 is also using a Receptor unit, but with a single CME UF8 fully-weighted keyboard and sustain, expression and volume pedals. I chose the CME keyboards for a number of reasons. The most important one was that they had dedicated MIDI channel change buttons, something I needed in 2006 because of the way the Receptors had to be programmed. I liked their keyboard action, their clear and simple controls, and the fact that they offer eight knobs and eight faders too. They are well built and withstood the first three tours with no problems."
Keys 4
"This is my rig. I use a single Yamaha DX7 MkII as my keyboard. Whilst I play a few lines in some of the songs, most of my parts are triggers for sounds that could not easily be played or reproduced live. As a sound source, I use an Akai S3200XL sampler, in which I sampled and programmed all the appropriate sounds. I also use a Voice Box pedal identical to the one used by lead guitar two to reproduce the Martian cry 'Ulla' sound.
Separately, I also play the Persian tar in one song. This interesting instrument was used in the original recording and plays the lead line in 'Horsell Common And The Heat Ray'. When we first put the live show together in 2006, I realised that none of the guitar players could play this part, as they were busy with other parts that could not be put in the backing track without the show suffering from a visual point of view. So I found a tar on eBay, bought it, started practising, and found that I could play this part myself, as it wasn't very difficult, even though I am not a guitar player."
Orchestra:
"The strings we use (violins, violas, celli and basses) are all acoustic, and their sound is captured using contact microphones."
Monitoring:
"All band members, Jeff and the guest artistes are using custom-made in-ear monitors, which allows for a quiet stage and provides everyone with an optimum mix. The strings use standard generic in-ear monitors."
Guest artiste mics:
"As Jeff feels that TWOTW is more theatrical than your average rock concert, and the guest artistes are actually acting as well as singing, we use headsets rather than hand-held mics. All guest artistes' in-ears and mics are also wireless, giving them complete freedom of movement."




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Posted 10/06/2009 08:07


Alexischick
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Most informative Bagnewauckland love it, artillerygirl is very delighted about something very important
Artillerygirl (bfc&p)

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Posted 10/06/2009 14:59




Enigma
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Wow! Fabulous in-depth information of this amazing man Bagnewauckland ! Gosh! The detail of your knowledge is phenomenal! Are you planning to do a Documentary of this?

Even I have not got that detail! WOW indeed!

A very impressed Loxley !

 


Loxley xxx

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Posted 10/06/2009 21:07




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I Didn't write it!
Maybe I should make the author's name bold.... Yes, I'll do that now




Brendan Agnew: TWOTW Site Admin and overall Nutter

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Posted 10/06/2009 22:23




Enigma
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Even so , really interesting information.Is Nigel a Jeff Wayne crew member?

Loxley xx


Loxley xxx

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Posted 10/06/2009 22:27




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I think he's just a writer for Performing Musician, who interviewed Gaetan Schurrer (AKA nG): ProTools Wizard, Keyboard Player, Tar Player, Programmer and more




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Posted 10/06/2009 22:48




Enigma
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Absolutely fab information for the true Jeff Wayne nut fan!

Thank you for sharing that gem!


Loxley xxx

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Posted 10/06/2009 23:01




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I was doing a Google Search for "war of the worlds""CME UF6" and it popped up




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