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The 1897 'Pearsons' Version Of TWOTW
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Posted 06/05/2005 01:59


Martian Elder
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H.G. Wells Collectors Book Of Science Fiction

Printed matter  (book)
Released by 'Castle Books' 1978 & reprinted 1986
Number of pages - 514
Illustrated throughout
Hard bound
Colour Dust jacket & black & white illustrations
Size - 242mm X 170mm
Edited by Alan K Russel

Contents -  H.G. Wells Biographical Note

Stories in "" are complete - All fully illustrated with the original period artwork
 
"The War Of The Worlds" - The Country Of The Blind - The Flowering Of The Strange Orchid - Aepyornis Island - "The First Men In The Moon" - The Diamond Maker - The Story Of The Inexperienced Ghost - The Empire Of The Ants - "Stories Of The Stone Age" (5 intotal) - The Stolen Bacaillus - In The Abyss - The Valley Of The Spiders - "When The Sleeper Wakes" - The Man Who Could Work Miracles - The Land Ironclads

The main story we are concentrating on is 'The War Of The Worlds'. The story here is the original 'Pearsons Magazine' April - December 1897 publication, and shown in full with the '2' Cosmo Rowe illustrations and the '65' Warwick Goble illustrations (with headers). The story is presented unabridges how H.G. Wells first wrote it for 'Pearsons Magazine' in 1897, and differs from the novelisation released in 1898.

Some of the main parts of the story I would like to point out that are included in the 1897 story, removed or changed for the 1898 story are as follows - During the chapter of 'The Destruction Of Weybridge & Sheperton' (1897) the Narrator and the Artilleryman are seperated, much like the 1898 version, but this is the last time we hear of the Artilleryman and he does not appear again. The 1898 story had the chapter 'The Man On Putney Hill' included, missing from the 1897 [i]Pearsons[/i]. The Narrator (1897) briefly mentions the barbaric ways of how the humans are treated during the later part of the story, observed from the pit that he and the curate occupy during 'What We Saw From the Ruined House'. The Narrator mentions of how the body of a man is disected by the Martians, this being entirely removed for the 1898 publication. In the 1898 novel, the great 'flying machine' is mentioned on a couple of occasions during the later part of the story. Again the Narrator mentions the machine, but with a little more detail into its purpose. Apart from other suttle changes between the two stories, the other major change is towards the end. The Narrator (1898) happens to find the Martian pit while looking down from Primrose Hill, to wonder for some 3 days to be kindly taken in by survivors of the war, of which he leaves after a short while and heads home. The 1897, after finding the Martians dead, he became a Special Constable for 10 days before returning home.

The whole story is placed around the wonderful yet oddly looking machines by Warwick Goble. Not entirely accurate to H.Gs description, given point to H.G critising the artists work in one small paragraph during the story, but non the less wonderful to look at in there entirity.

One of Warwick Gobles fine illustrations (Jonathan Smith Collection)

I only now of the two edition of 'H. G. Wells Collectors  Book Of Science Fiction' that were released, both having differant cover. The first released edition had a curious 'alien' creature wearig a space suit (better word for it) complete with face mask and gun. The second edition was more to the mark, featuring a wonder rendition of the Martian Fighting Machines attack upon the 'Thunderchild'.

I have seen copies of this book turning up in some odd places, but if looking for the book I would recomend a book search company or even www.ebay.com which I have seen some from time to time appear and at very good prices.

'A worth while book to the collection?' - most certainly.

Jon

 

 

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Posted 07/05/2005 11:12


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http://www.uta.edu/english/danahay/WW/demo1/cosmo.html

Try this site for the Cosmopolitan edition, which is - I think - the same as the Pearson version.

-Gnorn


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Posted 07/05/2005 16:49


Martian Elder
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Thats correct. The Cosmopolitan version was identicle to the Pearsons version. The Pearsons version was released in the U.K in 1897 and the Cosmopolitan version was released in the U.S roughly around the same time.

I beleive that HG sold the story to Pearsons for about £250 in 1897.

Jon

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Posted 15/06/2005 16:28
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i have found this edition( 1978) for 9 quid in good condition is that about the right price
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Posted 15/06/2005 16:41


Martian Elder
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That is a very good price. I would snap it up at that price.

Jon

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Posted 15/06/2005 17:12
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cheers . its on order
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Posted 19/09/2008 11:10


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Quite an old topic..

I have both 1897 versions, the Pearsons' and Cosmopolitan as originals here. Nicely bound as books. Awesome to look at.

I have noticed that there are a lot more Goble pictures in the 1897 versions as there are in the illustrated 1898 first edition book from Harpers which I also own.

I love the illustration of the flying machine which was seen by the brother who was leaving England with the Elphinstones. That must be the very first rendition of an alien spaceship in any novel. Somewhere on the www I saw a picture of an early "aeroplane" which looked similar to the one that Goble drew . I cannot find it, but I remember that it must have been around 1894/95 when it was constructed...

 

Edit: I found it.  Powered by two 180 hp steam engines !?!

http://www.scienceandsociety.co.uk/results.asp?image=10423875&wwwflag=2&imagepos=92

 

 

 

 

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Posted 21/09/2008 02:47
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Wow, I actually have that same book. I've found it interesting, despite the fact that it is crippled by only having the first editions of the stories. Which is awesome, of course, but I feel that an author's wishes for changes should be respected.
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Posted 21/09/2008 03:19




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I wish I had either of those! I only have later editions.

I've read both versions, though (pearsons and novel).

It's interesting that Wells hated Goble's illustrations, isn't it?


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Posted 21/09/2008 11:04


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Well, even by the 1890's the MFM's look... clunky.

By comparison to the machines from the controversial 2005 Hollywood version they look throughly mechanical not living things at all...

It's all in the eyes (IMO) of the Musical version where that "living quality" Wells wrote of is...

 

 


"Grotesque gleam of a time no history will ever fully describe!"

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