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Introduction/Experiences
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Posted 25/11/2007 17:49


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Okay, this seems to be the best place to post an introduction, as well as sharing my early experiences with WotW. My name is Dallow (hello), I am 34 years of age and I have been listening to this magnificent record for almost as long as my memory takes me.

I was first introduced to it via a friend's brother in 1979 when I was about 6 years old. Being so young, I didn't really understand the story but golly did the sounds speak to me. All I had known musically by this time was a children's compilation record called 'All Aboard' and the greatest hits of Father Abraham and The Smurfs so, as you can imagine, it was a bit of a mindblower. One day when I was out shopping with my mother, I recognised the cover in W.H. Smiths and excitedly begged her to buy it for me. I think even then (on double cassette with the flappy cardboard cover) it was about a tenner, not far from what the CD costs today. Reluctantly, she bought it for me and I got to own one of the greatest albums ever made. Within a few months, I wore the tapes out completely and upgraded to the vinyl edition, which was exhausted just as quick.

By 1980, I knew the thing word for word. I think this could've been the album that made me dance for the very first time in my life. The music is so descriptive of the situations that, when coupled with the terrific artwork, it felt like I was listening to a movie - as incredibly stupid as that may sound. When Richard Burton looked straight into the eyes of his beloved Carrie, I felt love and emotion at an age that I shouldn't have. When Thunder Child took on the Fighting Machine, I shouted "Come on Thunder Child" at decibels that annoyed my mother endlessly. The guitar licks introduced me to a much heavier style of music and instead of listening to Adam and The Ants, like the rest of my school friends did, I got into Thin Lizzy, Black Sabbath and the Sex Pistols. I guess now would be a great time to thank Jeff Wayne personally for changing my life in this way...

Now I'm 34 and I still play WotW regularly. My enthusiasm for it has never faded and whenever I pop the CD's into my disc tray, I throw myself into them heart and soul. Unfortunately, I missed the first set of recent concerts but come December 22nd, I'll be there at the front giving Chris Thompson a run for his money in the vocal stakes.

Anyway, sorry to have rambled on. Thank you for letting me join this pretty site and I look forward to talking with you all on the boards shortly.

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"Tell me what kind of weapon is love when it comes to the fight?"

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Posted 25/11/2007 18:44




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Welcome to the site, it is pretty, isn't it?





Brendan Agnew: TWOTW Site Admin and overall Nutter

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Posted 26/11/2007 05:50


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Yes, it's about time someone gave their time to such a wonderful album. Until yesterday, I had no idea a forum like this existed.

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Posted 26/11/2007 10:43




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Welcome to the site, Dallow!


-----------------

Le Grand Fromage! (Le New Generation!)

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Posted 23/07/2009 22:10
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I spied WOTW in the racks of my favorite record store back in 1978. Although I enjoyed concept albums (especially the works of the Alan Parsons Project), I hesitated purchasing it immediately. I couldn't figure out how a classic work of literature could work as, of all things, a rock and roll album. And on top of that, the legendary Richard Burton was lending his talents to it. Those two elements seemed somehow at odds with each other.

But the striking cover art and the WOTW story itself (I loved the George Pal movie) won me over in the end. I was immediately hooked. The sublime narration, the hard-driving rock music, the orchestrations, the sound effects, all of it was almost a religious experience.

Several months later, a science fiction magazine carried a review of the album written by David Gerrold (who wrote "The Trouble With Tribbles" episode of the original "Star Trek" TV series), and I'll always remember his opening sentence: "I'm not even going to try to be objective. I love this album!"

One of my friends was attending a nearby university that had its own planetarium, of which he was the director. He started showing WOTW to university students on weekends, complete with planetarium effects (which I, unfortunately, never got to see). The neat thing was, the planetarium projector rose elevator-like out of a console in the center of the room. And my friend had timed the "Epilogue" so that the projector would descend into the floor and the panel doors would close shut, obliterating the last star on the domed ceiling, just as the last telemetry beeps suddenly cut out. I heard the audiences went wild over that.

Just a couple of obersvations and reminiscences.

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